1. slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

    slackmistress:

    bethanysworld:

    fightingforanimals:

    Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

    Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

    Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

    When she started out, Veronika states,

    “Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

    And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

    Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

    You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

    To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

    For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

    For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

    Important in so many ways.

    This is amazing and wonderful.

    Reblogged from: toomanystarstocount
  2. digg:

Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

    digg:

    Watch the Queen of England age through bank notes.

    Reblogged from: rudegay15
  3. apatheticghost:

    what i learned from school

    1. im a fucking piece of shit
    2. everybody else is also a fucking piece of shit
    3. mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell
    Reblogged from: fellforthememories
  4. elizabitchtaylor:

    I’m such a nice girl, I’m so sick of being fuckzoned!!!!!!!

    What’s the fuckzone you ask? it’s this zone that guys put you in where they only want to fuck you; they don’t want to have a friendship with you and they aren’t satisfied with emotional commitment, they just want sex!!!!!

    I’m a nice girl!!!! Stop putting me in the fuckzone!!!!!!!

    Reblogged from: fellforthememories
  5. To the boy who said I should be more ladylike:
    I will not cross my legs or twirl my hair
    around my finger because it makes
    me whole.
    I will not bat my eyelashes at you
    when you hold the door open for me
    and I will not bat my eyelashes at you
    when you don’t.
    I will not wait for your text messages every night
    as if I need your written validation
    for my existence.
    I will not sit back and laugh at jokes that I
    don’t find funny because I can make a room
    roar with laughter in seconds flat.

    To the boy who said I’m “smart for a girl”:
    I will not stop reading book after book
    until I’m sure my knowledge can wipe you
    off your feet.
    I will not feel guilty when I correct your grammar
    or point out when you have misspoken.
    I will not bow down to you because your father
    is a successful businessman and I will not
    let you leave until you hear about my mother
    who is a profound bio-chemist.
    I will not stop using words that confuse you
    and I will not stop discussing politics or
    the woes of capitalism because my female opinions
    make you ‘uncomfortable’.

    To the boy who said he hated my body:
    I will not spend extra hours at the gym
    to keep you from seeing my thighs jiggle
    and I will not eat food fit for birds
    to ensure you can fit your hand between my thighs.
    I will not stop wearing that skin tight dress that
    makes my ass look out of this world and I
    certainly will not break your gaze when
    you evaluate my worth.
    I will not stop applying winged eyeliner or bright
    red lipstick because I’m not here to look
    like your man-made masterpiece.
    I will not be a product of your temptation.

    To the boy who sees me as an equal:
    I will not praise you as if you are a rare species
    nor will I boast that you are one of a kind.
    I will not drunkenly utter that “I’ve finally got one!”
    to my girlfriends over wine
    because a boy with a level head shouldn’t be
    impossible to find.
    I will not pin you up next to my trophies
    or diplomas as if you are some sort of accomplishment.
    I will not degrade you to what we have been degraded
    to all along.

    I will defend the girls who are told they are not ladylike
    I will protect the girls who are told they are too smart
    I will support the girls who are told they should fix their bodies
    I will fight for the girls who you tell are not good enough
    and I will praise the girls who simply do not care.

    Equality is a right, not a rarity.

    Kimberly Siehl | Equality is a right, not a rarity (via hangingwallflower)
    Reblogged from: lavietaziem
  6. Reblogged from: lavender-ice
  7. rosefire:

gaywitch-practisingabortion:

situationalstudent:

purplespacecats:

professorbutterscotch:

kiskolee:

THIS.

I have never thought about it in this context
that’s actually really, really creepy.

I… fuck.

Yeah, basically.

I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

    rosefire:

    gaywitch-practisingabortion:

    situationalstudent:

    purplespacecats:

    professorbutterscotch:

    kiskolee:

    THIS.

    I have never thought about it in this context

    that’s actually really, really creepy.

    I… fuck.

    Yeah, basically.

    I once pointed this out to my mother and she just stared at me, in stunned silence for ages. 

    There will always be a girl who is less sober, less secure, with less friends walking in a darker part of town. I want her safe just as much as I want me safe.

    Reblogged from: notshani
  8. lifeonsundays:

Flâneur.

    lifeonsundays:

    Flâneur.

    Reblogged from: unexotic
  9. Bring on your tear gas, bring on your grenades, your new supplies of Mace, your state troopers and even your national guards. But let the record show we ain’t going to be turned around.
    Ralph Abernathy (via kushandwizdom)
    Reblogged from: kushandwizdom
  10. The little things? The little moments?
    — They aren’t little.
    John Zabat-Zinn (via theflowershop)
    Reblogged from: unexotic
  11. Reblogged from: po1o
  12. Reblogged from: word-stuck
  13. Don’t you dare, for one more second, surround yourself with people who are not aware of the greatness that you are.
    Jo Blackwell-Preston (via aquoteadaykeepsthemonstersaway)
    Reblogged from: frenchchiq
  14. Reblogged from: t0rum
  15. 
What even are cats?
WE MAY NEVER TRULY KNOW

    What even are cats?

    WE MAY NEVER TRULY KNOW

    Reblogged from: pagingme
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